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Solar assisted radiant floor heating system - Page 2

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Posted by nicksanspam on January 13, 2007, 7:18 pm
 


I'd use the same overhang for all, designed to match summer and winter needs,
and make the underside reflective so it augments winter sun.


Less costly, if reflectors are cheaper than tubes, per Btu of output.
We seem to need more tube specs or guarantee information to know if
we can avoid the dump load.

Nick


Posted by Ecnerwal on January 12, 2007, 1:18 pm
 


Pour 2-3 inches of concrete. Consider either a dyed and/or patterned
concrete finish, terrazzo, or a tile floor rather than the wood floor,
which acts as an insulator to some extent. If you stick to wood,
consider thinner options such as 5/16 inch glue-down parquet rather than
3/4 inch boards.


2 inch waterproof (extruded) polystyrene (XPS - blue or pink depending
on brand)


Pour 2-3 inches of concrete.


http://radiantcompany.com  (Just a happy tubing-only customer)


The non-concrete options tend to require running the water hotter
(poorer thermal connection requires larger temperature differential to
get the same heat into the building), which makes solar less effective.
The hotter it needs to be, the less heat you can effectively collect for
the same collector area.

Larger diameter tubing requires less energy (electrical) to pump .vs.
smaller diameter tubing.

--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by

Posted by Rob Dekker on January 15, 2007, 6:29 am
 

2 inch insulation, 2 inch suspended slap. Plus the floor itself (hardwood or
laminate). Mmmm. That is 4 to 5 inch.
Here is my predicament :

Any raise in downstairs floor forces adjustments across the rooms downstairs
(kitchen counter tops, interior doors etc etc).
I can handle 1 inch extra, but if the new radiant floor-over-existing-slab is
thinker than 1 1/2 inch, then I have to start raising
exterior windows and doors too !
And that would mean a significant (expensive) project.
So, what is the best (energy efficient) method to get a radiant floor that is 1
inch think, and at maximum 1 1/2 inch.... ?




Posted by Jeff on January 15, 2007, 10:25 am
 Rob Dekker wrote:

laminate). Mmmm. That is 4 to 5 inch.

(kitchen counter tops, interior doors etc etc).

thinker than 1 1/2 inch, then I have to start raising

1 inch think, and at maximum 1 1/2 inch.... ?

I think you are asking too much.

Someone has mentioned warmboard and I  think  that is a good choice.
Warmboard is 1 1/8" thick. That leaves you with 3/8" flooring to get
your inch and a half and *no* insulation underneath. The recommendation
I see is to have 4 times the "R" value below as the R value above (I
think 20% loss). You are going to have to work a trade between losses
and how thick you want that floor. My guess is  that the warm board by
itself is 50% loss with an unisulated slab. Whether insulating the slab
edges is your solution I don't know, it will certainly slow down the
responsiveness coupling so tightly into the slab.

     Jeff



Posted by Rob Dekker on January 16, 2007, 6:27 am
 
...

laminate). Mmmm. That is 4 to 5 inch.

(kitchen counter tops, interior doors etc etc).

thinker than 1 1/2 inch, then I have to start

1 inch think, and at maximum 1 1/2 inch.... ?

You might be right, but I still have hope. And a couple of designs that I want
an expert to review.


is 1 1/8" thick. That leaves you with 3/8" flooring

So that (warm board) is probably not going to be my choice.


above (I think 20% loss).

Thanks ! That is a rule of the thumb that makes sense.
I will aim for that.


that floor. My guess is  that the warm board by itself

solution I don't know, it will certainly slow down

Yeah. And the 50% loss is a bit too much for my liking.
I still do not know if the slab is insulated or not.
Is there a way to find out ? (apart from literally turning the house upside
down..)



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