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Thermally conductive adhesive - Page 2

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Posted by Solar Flare on November 11, 2005, 10:47 pm
 
Yup, You were correct. The logical statement meaning was twisted by me. Sorry.

You are correct about the product nomograph.

I think the metal impregnated epoxies may be a better choice.



Posted by Jeff Thies on November 11, 2005, 12:02 pm
 
meshach@allstream.net wrote:


That won't be it, as it is a silicone rubber. Try it, put a dab on a
metal surface and heat up the metal.

   An epoxy would be better at conductivity because it is denser but
would have other disadvantages.

You can try a mechanical conection with a heatsink compound (a bracket).
The heatsink compound helps eliminate any spaces, thin is what you want.

Brazing sounds right to me, if you have the skills (I don't!). I would
think that soldering that would be difficult because of the amount of
heat required.

   Jeff

Posted by Bruce in Alaska on November 11, 2005, 6:52 pm
  meshach@allstream.net wrote:


There area variety of Thremal Conductive Adheasive materials
available to you.  Years ago we used them to glue power
transistors to heatsinks and PCB's.  They are NOT cheap,
but they do exist. Locktite makes a few, as does Eastman Kodak,
3M, and a few other Materials Companies.  I have used them to glue
solidstate Temp Sensers into brass fixtures with very good
success. even when immersed in Seawater or Chilled Seawater.


Bruce in alaska
--
add a <2> before @

Posted by Bert Menkveld on November 12, 2005, 12:07 am
 Silicone caulking actually has reasonably good thermal conductivity ofaround
1W/m-K.  While this looks pretty poor compared to copper at 390W/m-K, it's
good enough, as long as you ensure you need only a thin layer of silicone.

I've used high-temperature silicone caulking (off the shelf at the local
building supplies store) in a flat plate solar hot water collector with good
results.

--
Bert Menkveld



Posted by Pokee Joe on November 22, 2005, 2:31 pm
 meshach@allstream.net wrote in


If you use electrical solder, the flux is not corrosive. It is plain
old pine sap and cleans off afterwards with a little alchohol.

Just don't drink the whiskey afterwards as the pine sap ruins the
taste :-)

regards,
Joe

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