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Posted by Jeff on March 17, 2007, 1:06 pm
 
Morris Dovey wrote:

Well, I can understand that!

   I assume that you have been all over this:

<URL: http://www.ornl.gov/~webworks/cppr/y2001/rpt/27113.pdf  />

   I haven't seen anything that models losses so it seems difficult to
figure output power and efficiency.


  and working our way up to a

   Doesn't seem to me that you want to move heat through PVC as the
thermal conductance is pretty low. They do have a connectors to go from
hard copper to (C)PVC, and that seems to me a better bet (splicing in
copper for the heating/cooling links). CPVC is still pretty cheap and is
rated at a much higher temp.

   It's all a bit too complex for me and I'm a simple guy!

   Good Luck,
Jeff


Posted by Morris Dovey on March 17, 2007, 3:55 pm
 
Jeff wrote:
| Morris Dovey wrote:

|    I assume that you have been all over this:
|
| <URL: http://www.ornl.gov/~webworks/cppr/y2001/rpt/27113.pdf  />
|
|    I haven't seen anything that models losses so it seems difficult
| to figure output power and efficiency.

Have a copy - thanks. As with a lot of projects, the development
process seems to be: calculate to seventeen decimal places, measure
with a yardstick, cut with an axe, and adjust to fit. Thus far, we
seem to have the last three steps down pretty well. :-)

|   and working our way up to a
|| practical 1 to 2 hp engine. The first application (pump) begs for
|| an inexpensive PVC plumbing solution so, unless we can puzzle out
|| how to inexpensively move the heat through a PVC wall without
|| melting it, we won't be using a concentrating collector.
|
|    Doesn't seem to me that you want to move heat through PVC as the
| thermal conductance is pretty low. They do have a connectors to go
| from hard copper to (C)PVC, and that seems to me a better bet
| (splicing in copper for the heating/cooling links). CPVC is still
| pretty cheap and is rated at a much higher temp.

You're right. What we'd need to do is pass tubing (that can withstand
high temperatures) through the PVC wall to the interior of the engine.
The big problem is that the tubing heats up and causes the PVC to
fail. There are materials that provide a technical solution - but
their cost and lack of general availability makes them unusable for
meeting the project goals. :-(

| It's all a bit too complex for me and I'm a simple guy!

I have a sneaking suspicion that, as with many problemss, the whole
seems complex but the constituant parts may be simple.

I've read that developments start out with a simple concept, add
details until it seems hopelessly complex, and then simplify to
reasonableness. AFAICT, most people seem to abandon ship during stage
two.

|    Good Luck,

If I can't be expert, being lucky might help. Thanks!

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/StirlingProject.html



Posted by Morris Dovey on March 18, 2007, 2:47 am
 Morris Dovey wrote:

| My compadre
| in the project has promised to drop off some video files he shot of
| one of the most recent test engines running last night.
|
| I'll put 'em on my web site at the link below as soon as I can.

He did and I did - and you can find a link to Stirling.WMV on the web
page below.

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/StirlingProject.html



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