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Posted by k1hb on January 30, 2010, 10:23 pm
 
i look out the window: zero F! brrrr
all around my house: shade trees, but:
100 yards away, full sun exposure and plenty room for a passive water
collector array any size.

that means what?
pressurized antifreeze system, and insulated underground return,
right?
worth the trouble?
have my doubts.

ideas?

fred


Posted by Josepi on January 31, 2010, 12:43 am
 
Solar Thermal has a short payback. Most claim about 2-3 years. Long runs
underground can cost a bit. Share the runs with a wood/coal  burning graden
shed.


i look out the window: zero F! brrrr
all around my house: shade trees, but:
100 yards away, full sun exposure and plenty room for a passive water
collector array any size.

that means what?
pressurized antifreeze system, and insulated underground return,
right?
worth the trouble?
have my doubts.

ideas?

fred



Posted by daestrom on January 31, 2010, 2:42 pm
 k1hb wrote:

I love trees, but maybe replace some of your 'shade trees' with
deciduous ones that lose there leaves in winter?  If you're looking for
space-heating, these can be a great compliment as they will block sun in
summer to reduce cooling costs and allow the sun through in winter.

(if you do go with the longer run, insulate both the supply and return,
not just the return)

daestrom

Posted by Josepi on January 31, 2010, 10:55 pm
 There is that tree falacy again!!!

You will have to lower your roof to a 6 foot level and grow your home under
the lowest branch. These people living in the artic circle don't seem know
about the sun being overhead in the summer, and think trees can shade the
roof of your 280 square foot home's roof. The winter bare branches give more
undesirable shade than the full foilage will in the summer.

BTW: I doubt an evergreen tree will ever be considered a shade tree. Crawl
under one.



I love trees, but maybe replace some of your 'shade trees' with
deciduous ones that lose there leaves in winter?  If you're looking for
space-heating, these can be a great compliment as they will block sun in
summer to reduce cooling costs and allow the sun through in winter.

(if you do go with the longer run, insulate both the supply and return,
not just the return)

daestrom

k1hb wrote:


Posted by Josepi on February 1, 2010, 2:39 am
 Most of us do not live in an outhouse that will fit under a tree limb and on
the hot parts of the day have sun at a very high elevations. You must be
brave, living that far north.

Blocking the breeze gives more heat gain.


Nonsense. Shade trees can shade a house for a good part of the summer day,
even
if they don't shade it all, all day. That can make a big difference.


Josepi wrote:


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