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Posted by Anthony Matonak on September 11, 2006, 7:16 pm
 
Jeff wrote:

Perhaps we need to transition to all straw houses that will keep us
warm in summer and cool in winter... Or perhaps one and only one
solution isn't the answer.

Anthony

Posted by Biff on September 12, 2006, 11:41 am
 

Jeff wrote:

Maybe, but that was when coal was cheap and we didn't know about global
climate change.


Posted by daestrom on September 11, 2006, 10:57 pm
 

Seems the 'jury' is out on this.  Many sites quote from ASHRAE that steel is
worse....

http://oikos.com/esb/30/steelframe.html
http://www.energy.ca.gov/efficiency/deter_steel_framing.html

But a few with some newer data suggest steel is 'as good' or better if
installed with 'wraps' or use newer steel studs with web-slots and
complicated shapes.  Steel also allows further spacing of studs (one site
goes as far as 48" centers).

http://www.ornl.gov/sci/roofs+walls/research/detailed_papers/steel_frame/index.html

daestrom


Posted by Solar Flare on September 12, 2006, 2:45 am
 Isn't that a little ridiculous though? Isn't that like comparing
apples with oranges? Why don't we apply exterior sheething to wooden
walls and have the best of both?




http://www.ornl.gov/sci/roofs+walls/research/detailed_papers/steel_frame/index.html


Posted by daestrom on September 13, 2006, 12:01 am
 

Yeah, well I guess that makes as much sense.  It seems steel has some uses,
but isn't all that great in exterior walls.  But I was first responding to
the post that steel is 400 times worse than wood.  Turns out it's only about
twice as bad.  Still pretty ugly.  But if you have to go on 48" centers for
thermal performance, well let me know because I don't think I want to build
a house with 48" studs.

Now, if they made the 'studs' in two interlocking parts, kind of like
sheet-piling used in waterfront areas, with a thin thermal break between the
two pieces.....  Perhaps if wood construction material prices continue to
rise as they have here in the US.  Haven't seen much reduction even after
the US/Canada soft-woods issues were worked out.

daestrom


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