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underground pipe question - Page 3

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Posted by News on March 31, 2006, 10:58 am
 


I would have the underground pipes in larger conduit pipes for ease of
replacement. The pipes can be wrapped in normal high performing pipe
insulation, and the larger pipe filled with vermiculite.  The large conduit
pipe can be wrapped in waterproof insulation.

I would have the water in the UFH pipes in the house, and the pipes under
the ground, isolated from the solar collection tank via a heat exchanger.
The last thing you want is crud and debris in these pipes.  An advantage is
that the UFH and underground pipes can be totally separate water from the
water in the tank.  Then cheap iron CH pumps can be used instead of
expensive non-ferrous bronze.  The heat exchanger could be a large coil of
copper pipe (maybe finned tube) at the top of the solar collector tank to
take advantage of the stratification.

There is no mention of DHW in this setup. Or did I miss it as I only skimmed
the article?



Posted by northstar on January 10, 2006, 6:10 pm
 
http://www.radiantcompany.com/system/evacuated.shtml

This site is useful because it tells you all about laying tubing in
northern climates

http://www.btfsolar.com/mailform.htm

This site is useful because you should consider evacuated tubes instead
on flat panels in northern climates.  His prices are fair and he has
been very helpful to me.

http://www.sunswarmth.com/

This site is useful because Richard Huelskap also has experience
burying tubing in a northern climates.


Posted by Gary on January 10, 2006, 7:34 pm
 

northstar wrote:

Nice link -- thanks!

The simulations I have run for my climate (SW Montana   8000 Deg-Days) have not
shown a great advantage for evac tube collectors over a good, selective surface,
flat plate collector.  Perhaps this is because my storage temperature tends to
run at a fairly low temperature, so the losses from the flat plate collectors
are less than they would be for some installations.
If you have any data/studies that show an advantage for evac tube collectors
over flat plate collectors, I would be very interested in seeing them, as I am
just about ready to write a big check for collectors.

Thanks -- Gary






www.BuildItSolar.com
gary@BuildItSolar.com
"Build It Yourself" Solar Projects









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Posted by Gary on January 10, 2006, 7:44 pm
 wp wrote:

You can look up the gain you will get for tracking the sytem here:

http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/pubs/redbook/
Just download the Maine chapter and look at 1 axis tracking.

It looks like about 15% to 25% gain for Portland, ME through the winter,
depending on the month.  As Robert says, you may want to consider whether this
is worth the effort, or you would just be better off builing bigger?



--


Gary

www.BuildItSolar.com
gary@BuildItSolar.com
"Build It Yourself" Solar Projects









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Posted by SJC on January 10, 2006, 7:52 pm
 

  You might be able to find some data on tube collectors here.
http://www.thermomax-group.com/PRODUCTS/SOLAR/productsS.htm
   But when you compare it to flat plate it is based on temperature difference.
http://www.sunearthinc.com/imperial_series_flat_plate.htm
  If you used a large store, small difference and a fluid to air heat pump,
http://www.econar.com/products/forcedair.htm
  Maybe hotter is not necessarily better...just a thought.


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